Tuesday Tip: 3 Ways to Limit Facebook Data Usage | CREDO Mobile Blog

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Do you know how much data you use during normal Facebook usage?

Credo has 3 smart and common sense tips for limiting your data usage, especially if you’re not on an unlimited or large data plan.

Normal use of the Facebook app—browsing your News Feed and looking at photos—consumes about 1.5MB per minute. Watching videos on Facebook uses around 2.6MB per minute. Spend 45 minutes a day on the Facebook app and it’ll cost you over 2GB of data in a month, which does not include the data the app drains while it runs in the background.
Read what the tips are…

Source: Tuesday Tip: 3 Ways to Limit Facebook Data Usage | CREDO Mobile Blog

Spammers using Facebook Messenger to Spread Locky Ransomware

One more thing to worry about…

If you came across any Facebook Message with an image file (exactly .SVG file format) send by any of your Facebook friends, just avoid clicking it.

An ongoing Facebook spam campaign is spreading malware downloader among Facebook users by taking advantage of innocent-looking SVG image file to infect computers.

If clicked, the file would eventually infect your PC with the nasty Locky Ransomware, a family of malware that has quickly become one of the favorite tools among criminals due to its infecting capabilities.

Read the article & view the image file being sent (safely)…

Source: Spammers using Facebook Messenger to Spread Locky Ransomware

Ultimate Social Media Shortcuts Cheat Sheet — Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Tumblr, Google+

This comes complete with a handy, downloadable Cheat Sheet for the major social media applications.  Nice to have on hand!

Keyboard shortcuts come in handy when we have to accomplish tasks real quick. Here is an ultimate cheat sheet which includes social media keyboard shortcuts for websites like Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, etc.

Source: Ultimate Social Media Shortcuts Cheat Sheet — Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Tumblr, Google+

Top Phishing Scams on Social Media

For older people just getting into technology, the “imposter customer care” scam seems to be the most prevalent. So many have casually remarked to me how the “nice man on the phone fixed all their computer problems.” The worst thing is that they actually paid for the service, a double pay day for the scammers.

Phishing attempts on social media have more than doubled over the past year as scammers find new ways to trick people into providing personal and financial information.

During the first quarter of 2016, ploys to glean log-in credentials, credit card and other ID-worthy information soared 150 percent over the same period in 2015, according to Proofpoint, which provides social media security services to leading companies and nearly 225 million of their individual followers on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+, Instagram and Pinterest.

Read more…

Source: Top Phishing Scams on Social Media

Twitter Has Stopped Showing Ads to Some of Its Most Valuable Users | By Peter Kafka

Twitter Has Stopped Showing Ads to Some of Its Most Valuable Users | By Peter Kafka

loser gif
If you’re still seeing ads in twitter apparently you’re a loser!

Twitter makes its money by showing ads to its users.

But not all of its users: For the past few months, the social media company has stopped displaying ads, or has dramatically reduced the number of ads it displays, to a small group of some of its most prominent and active users.

For those people, Twitter is an ad-free, or nearly ad-free, experience.

Sources say Twitter made the move in an attempt to get some of its VIP users to stay engaged with the service. That seems a little counterintuitive for a company that appears to be focused on getting new users, not pleasing its hardcore base. But CEO Jack Dorsey seems to endorse the notion: Twitter started playing around with the idea in September, when Dorsey was interim boss, and has kept at it since he took the title for good.

Twitter sources say the company doesn’t select the no-ad or low-ad group purely by star power, but by a variety of criteria, including the volume and reach of the tweets they generate.

Read More…

Source: Twitter Has Stopped Showing Ads to Some of Its Most Valuable Users | <re/code> By Peter Kafka

Hacking your head: How cyber criminals use social engineering | Malwarebytes/Wendy Zamora

Hacking your head: How cyber criminals use social engineering

Social engineering is nothing new. It’s a tool of psychological manipulation that’s been used since the dawn of man. Why? To influence people into taking action that might not be in their best interest.

Sometimes it’s fairly harmless, like a child sweet-talking his mom in order to get extra candy. (I’m a victim of this one.) Many times, however, social engineering is used for nefarious purposes.

There are classic examples of social engineering at play throughout human history. Confidence tricks were first used by charmers in the 19th century to con people into trusting others with their valuables. (They should not have trusted…the charmers made off with the goods.) Psychological manipulation, otherwise known as propaganda, influenced droves of people during World War II to go out and buy war bonds. And advertising subtly hints that you’re not pretty enough until you buy this product.

Social engineering taps into the human psyche by exploiting powerful emotions such as fear, urgency, curiosity, sympathy, or the strongest feels of them all: the desire for free stuff.

Which is why cyber criminals have caught on.

Cyber crooks use this dangerous weapon to get at the weakest link: us. They know that the easiest way to penetrate a system is to go after the user, not the computer. “Attacking the human element has always been a favorite,” says Jean-Phillip Taggart, Senior Security Researcher at Malwarebytes. “Why use some hard technical flaw to acquire a password when you can simply ask the user for it?”

Read More…

Source:  Hacking your head: How cyber criminals use social engineering | Malwarebytes/Wendy Zamora

Facebook “Page Disabled” Phish Wants your Card Details | Malwarebytes UnPacked/Christopher Boyd

Facebook “Page Disabled” Phish Wants your Card Details — Targets Page Admins

Fake Facebook Security pages are quite a common sight, and there’s a “Your page will be disabled unless…” scam in circulation at the moment on random Facebook comment sections which you should steer clear of.

The scam begins with a message like this, courtesy of Twitter user Alukeonlife:

Warning!!!
Your page will be disabled.
Due to your page has been reported by other users.
Please re-confirm your page in order to avoid blocking. You violate our terms of service. If you are the original owner of this account, please re-confirm your account in order to avoid blocking.

If the multiple exclamation marks and generally terrible grammar didn’t give the game away, the following request certainly might:

To complete your pages account please confirm Http below:

https(dot)lnkd(dot)in/bNF9BUY?Facebook.Recovery.page

"Attention"

If you do not confirm, then our system will automatically block your account and you will not be able to use it again.
Thank you for the cooperation helping us improve our service.
The Facebook Team

Note that they use the Linkedin URL shortener, which is somewhat unusual – perhaps the scammers think people are growing suspicious of endless bit(dot)ly and goo(dot)gl URLs being sent their way, and are attempting to throw a business-centric sheen on their shenanigans. They won’t get away with it without a fight, however – Google Safe Browsing flags the final destination as a dubious website: and fires up a “Deceptive site ahead” warning:

Fake FaceBook Phishing Warning

As for the scam page itself, which is located at

report-fanpage(dot)gzpot(dot)com/Next/login(dot)htm

it looks like this:

FaceBook Phishing Scam Page

Read More…

Source:  Facebook “Page Disabled” Phish Wants your Card Details | Malwarebytes UnPacked/Christopher Boyd